Don't Miss A Thing

Follow Engadget

While we'd seen rumblings that it was in beta testing, Google's Chrome Remote Desktop app for Android made its official debut today. This means that those who fancy Mountain View's mobile OS can take a gander at files that reside on a Windows or Mac machine that's safely docked in the office. The Remote Desktop app has been available on the desktop for quite some time, and now the same access is available through Chrome on Android smartphones and tablets. For those who prefer Apple's devices, an iOS version of the software should be on the way soon.

0 Comments

It's becoming a trend to see more and more companies integrate their products with Apple's CarPlay, whether it be car manufacturers or makers of in-dash systems. The latest to join the movement is Hyundai, announcing that navigation-equipped 2015 Sonata models will feature the recently unveiled in-car infotainment system from Apple. Hyundai says that adopting CarPlay was an easy decision for its engineers, since it provides an interface that's already familiar to iPhone users and takes advantage of the new Sonata's 8-inch touchscreen. More importantly, Hyundai's plan to feature CarPlay makes it one of the more cost-effective brands to do so -- and that's a great thing, because not everyone can afford a Merdeces or a Ferrari.

0 Comments

Micaël Reynaud, Image courtesy of the Saatchi Gallery, London

It's easy to sneer at the idea of artists piggybacking on the GIF craze, but Google is taking the whole thing pretty seriously, especially now that Google+ supports the animated file format. The search giant is collaborating with the Saatchi Gallery in West London to host a number of looped moving images, displayed on giant TV screens, which it feels are worthy of public recognition. There's a hint of competitiveness, as a panel of judges (including His Artiness, Baz Luhrmann) will select a single winning GIF tonight. In the meantime, we've embedded the finalists from six different image categories after the break, ranked according to how much we like them and whether any of the artists are mates of ours.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

While Google has continued to toss new features into the camera app shipped on its Nexus devices, many Android phones replace it something else. But just as we revealed a few weeks ago, now it's available in the Play Store, ready to run on any phone or tablet using Android 4.4 KitKat. Beyond bits like Photo Sphere that we've seen before, Google is filling in the blanks on its new "Lens Blur" option. Meant to emphasize the subject while blurring the background for an impressive depth of field effect, it uses algorithms to simulate the large camera lens and aperture your phone or tablet doesn't actually have. Taking the photo requires an upward sweep to capture multiple images, used to estimate the depth of objects for a 3D map that lets the software re-render the photo later and blur specific items based on where it thinks they are. Google's Research Blog has more details on how it's all done, including the Lytro-like ability to change which object is in focus after you take the shot.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

"I'm terrified I might not actually be all that smart."

"Made a batch of Jello just to stick my dick in it. No regrets."

"I like taking the ferry because I get to drink in public legally."

This is just a small sampling of posts I've recently seen on Secret, an anonymous-sharing app that's part of a new trend in Silicon Valley. It's a little like Whisper, a competing app that's been around since 2012, except that instead of letting you broadcast your anonymous missives to the world, posts on Secret are limited to a network of friends based on your phone's address book.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

The boundary between your smartphone and your car is growing thinner by the day, and Jaguar Land Rover is the latest in a long line of car companies trying to work out the ideal balance between the two. The company's InControl Apps system has been in the works for months now, and we got to take a lot at their progress (in a spiffy new Range Rover Evoque, no less) at the New York International Auto Show. Here's how it works: after you load the companion app onto your Android device or iPhone (don't worry, the experience is the same for both), you connect it to your car via a USB port nestled in the center console. After that, your handset basically becomes inoperable, while all of your compatible apps appear on your car's display.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

The HTC One (M8) brought with it a load of new camera features, including its unique Duo Camera setup on its back side. Now, the handset maker is opening up the code that powers the pair in a SDK preview for third-party devs. This means that apps can be designed specifically for the M8's cameras with DualLens and DimensionPlus APIs baked right in. In other words, developers will get their hands on that bokeh-style refocusing and multi-angled shot selection in addition to depth maps from the pair of cameras. Of course, only time will tell how eager app makers are to latch on to HTC's smartphone snapshooting tricks, but at least now they'll have the necessary tools to do so.

0 Comments

US-AUTO-FORD MUSTANG-50TH ANNIVERSARY

Ford is marking the launch of the 2015 Mustang in the same way it did for the original 50 years ago -- by putting one at the top of the Empire State Building. The company has partnered with auto supplier DST to cut its latest sports car into pieces and reassemble it on the building's observation deck, 86 floors up. You can check out the vehicle for yourself if you visit the New York City skyscraper no later than April 17th.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

When some 1.1 million people played Pokémon together via Twitch's game-broadcasting service, developer Studio Bean must've gotten inspired. Choice Chamber takes the idea of the audience deciding what happens onscreen to a new level and injects Twitch chat into the game's DNA; here, the peanut gallery has a direct impact on the player's progression. As you make your way through a series of randomly generated rooms, the audience (people watching you broadcast via Twitch, of course) takes a series of polls that alter the game's flow. It's a lot like playing as dungeon master with your Dungeons and Dragons crew, but with a 21st century twist. As cool as voting on what weapon the player gets, or summoning a giant fist that wipes across the screen to obliterate a boss monster sounds, though, the project is only halfway to its $30,000 Kickstarter funding goal. With four days left in the campaign, Twitch has announced that it'll step in and match the funds needed to finish the game.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Arguably the coolest part about Anki Drive's robotic toy cars is that you could upgrade them over time with weapons and points as if they were character vehicles in a video game. Unlike a video game however, Anki's original system only had a single race track and just four available model cars (two were bundled in the starter kit). Further, there was only one mode of gameplay -- a Battle mode that encourages you to knock your opponent off the road -- which some might find a little tiresome after a while. Now, however, Anki has introduced not just two new tracks to the mix, but also a couple of new cars and a few software improvements that include the company's number one requested feature: race mode.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments